Posts Tagged ‘carnival destiny’

View from under a cruise ship

Starting with the most recognizable object, the anchor.  It weighs more than 10,500 kilograms, or 23,00 lbs and is attached to 13 lengths of anchor chain. Each length is 15 fathoms or 90 feet.

The large "odd shaped" object protruding from the front of the ship is the "bulbous bow." Used in most large modern ships with long, narrow hulls such as navy vessels, freighters and passenger ships the bulb modifies water flow around the hull reducing drag and increasing stability and speed. It also improves the "islands per gallon" 🙂 extending range up to 15 percent.

The "fan things" on the side are the bow thrusters. They allow the ship to turn in port. Only used at slow speeds or when stopped, they have reversible propellers to push the ship’s bow to port (left) or to starboard (right). When the bow thrusters are operated together with the pods (located at the stern of the ship) the ship is able to move sideways or turn on a dime.

The last photo is taken from directly under the ship at the bottom of the hull. The 101,353 ton Destiny (the first passenger ship to have exceed 83,676 tons since the Queen Elizabeth launched in 1938) is carefully positioned and lowered on the resting blocks shown in the photo.  Then the formerly submerged portions of the ship are cleaned and coated with anti-corrosive and anti-marine growth paint. They've also been using a new hull paint that reduces the ship's drag in the water.

 

Increase onboard revenue with digital pictures.

Recently onboard the Carnival Destiny I was fortunate to be photographed several times by the friendly staff.

Pouring over the giant wall of fully developed photographs, I couldn’t help thinking of the I-phone. You know, the nifty screen where you flip through pictures with a short flick of the tip of your forefinger.

Had Carnival shifted to digital cameras, the entire photo developing and printing process could be limited to only the pictures actually desired by passengers. It might look something like the kiosk at your local Walgreens.

It would reduce expenses by:

  • Saving back-end labor processing, printing and placing the photos up on the wall
  • Cutting the cost of all those negatives and photo paper

It would increase revenue by:

  • Freeing up a lot of retail wall space for other product.
  • Freeing up passenger time spent squinting and scanning the hundreds of prints so they spend time in other profitable places
  • Making it more convenient and easier to find the pictures.   By displaying watermarked digital images (categorized by date and time taken) on a few widescreen kiosks, as well as searchable via shipboard TVs, cell phones and even for purchase on the Cruise company’s website would increase exposure and sales.  Even friends at home could see and buy them.  Bottom line, I know there were a couple of photos I couldn’t locate on the wall. It would have been nice to casually browse for them on the web later from home.